Episode 32 Show Notes

On episode 32 of All Ears at Child’s Voice: A Hearing Loss Podcast, Haley and Elise are joined by Melissa Hyder. Melissa is Child’s Voice’s School Counselor, and a mom of three, two of which have hearing loss. Melissa talks about her journey through the grief process and how it differed for both children with hearing loss, her path to becoming a School Counselor, and what you can do as parents to help children work through big emotions. She shares insights on what she found helpful through her experiences with hearing loss, both as a parent and professional. Melissa works on “naming it to tame it” with our students and provides suggestions for how we can provide children with the language and coping skills in their everyday life.

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Resources from this episode:

Resources:

Whole Brain Child

Phonak hEARos: Hearing Like Me

Zones of Regulation

Calming corner examples

 

Haley:

Welcome to All Ears at Child’s Voice, a podcast discussing all things hearing loss. We aim to connect parents of children with hearing loss with the professionals who serve them. And now, to start the show…

Elise:

Welcome to all ears, a child’s voice, a podcast, discussing all things, hearing loss. We aim to connect parents of children with hearing loss, with the professionals who serve them. I’m Elise Sundburg. And I’m so excited for this conversation today.

Haley:

And I’m Haley Gubbins. Today on the show we talk to Melissa Hyder. Melissa is Child’s Voices, school counselor who received her bachelor’s of science at Cornerstone University in education. Melissa also received her school counselor master’s of arts through Lewis University. S is currently getting her learning behavior specialist, one certificate through Lewis University and she is a certified children’s yoga instructor. In addition to these wonderful accomplishments listed above Melissa is a mom to three kids. Two of which who have hearing loss. Landon is the oldest at 10 years old. And he has typical hearing. Aiden eight. And Sage is four. Both Aiden and Sage have hearing loss and wear bilateral hearing aids. As a mom of children with hearing loss, Melissa is also a Phonak hero where she has written articles to share her experience and support other parents and families navigating through hearing loss. Melissa, we are so excited to have you on the podcast today. Elise and I work closely with you on a professional level. And it’s so great to get to talk things through that we are working with our students on the podcast today. Thank you so much for doing this.

Melissa:

Thanks for having me.

Elise:

Before we jump into the main discussion, we like asking our guests to share a little something about themselves and their family. It could be anything, something cute, something funny, something heartwarming. Does anything come to mind?

Melissa:

Yeah, I was thinking about this question cause I hear on all of our podcasts and our family what we love to do is we love being active. And recently my husband, Matthew, coordinated a multifamily wiffle ball tournament game. So it was super fun and we had a bunch of kids and a bunch of parents and everyone was playing and we had a great time. It was really fun.

Haley:

That’s fun. Is it like a neighborhood?

Melissa:

Yeah, they were just really close family friends that we had in our neighborhood. Yeah.

Haley:

That sounds really fun.

Elise:

And that’s a different dynamic because us being on our own and not having kids, you have to think of your whole family and who will be a good match for Landon, Aiden, Sayge, but also the parents to mesh well.

Melissa:

Yes. Totally.

Haley:

That sounds like a really fun summer activity. So I’m glad you get to do that.

Elise:

All right. Well, we’re ready to jump into our discussion today. We’re so lucky to have Melissa because not only is she a professional working with children with hearing loss, but as a parent of three very different children, all with very different journeys. Melissa, could you give us a little more background into your family?

Melissa:

So Landon is 10 and he’s my child’s who’s hearing. And he is a sensitive, thoughtful, sweet guy. Aiden is my eight year old. He has hearing loss and he is my wild, confident, crazy adventurous child. And Sayge  who also has hearing loss. She is very sweet and sensitive and big emotions and loves to be all things girly and all things sporty. She wants to be just like her brothers. So, for Sayge and Aiden, my children with hearing loss. It’s interesting. I think their hearing loss is actually very similar. If you look on an audiogram, it’s maybe off by a couple of decibels each, but their journeys have been really different. Aiden went immediately from early intervention services right into the mainstream schools and had a great experience and was very successful. He tested out a speech right at the beginning of kindergarten and is doing really great. And Sayge is doing great too, her journey’s just a little different. So Sayge for her, it was great to have her at a school for children with hearing loss, which she is here at Child’s Voice. And she needs a little bit more support with her speech. So that’s kind of where we, what has led us to this place

Elise:

For those listening, we had the chance to talk over zoom with Aiden and his hearing itinerant. And that was a great experience to hear about how his mainstream is going and what his class looks like. We got to see a lot of videos from the itinerant, so that was amazing. And he seems like he is doing great advocating for himself and being out in his own. Do you think that’s because he was in a typical mainstream preschool and had to figure that out more on his own?

Melissa:

Yeah, that’s a good question. I think he did get more of throwing into the deep end and you’re going to sink or swim experience. And I would say yes, but I also think we’re in a great school district and hearing itinerants, I call them our angels. They really make mainstream possible. I don’t think he would be able to be as successful as he is without them. I actually know that full-heartedly so every one of his hearing itinerants has made such a difference for him. So that’s a huge piece. He’s had incredible teachers. So all of those pieces together, and I think his personality, he just tends to be more comfortable in his own skin, which I think really helps and benefits him.

Haley:

That’s great to hear because I know some parents, especially that listen to this podcast or other kids are already here, they’re really, really hesitant for that mainstream experience. And like you said, hearing itinerants are angels. I don’t think we talk about that enough because they are kind of the guiding hand to walk you through as a parent, but also to guide your children through those obstacles, to help them be more successful. They know everything about all the equipment. So it’s really encouraging to hear that just because your son is in a mainstream classroom, they are still being supported in any need that they have related to hearing loss. So that’s great.

Elise:

So when Aiden was going through preschool, were you a professional in this field yet? Were you doing school counselor or was this all before?

Melissa:

So I wanted to be a school counselor back in high school. That was when my vision and dream was born. I was going through a tough experience in high school and I missed a lot of school and I started falling behind in my classes and was really stressed out. And it was my school counselor that called me into her office and asked me what was going on and how she could support me. And I don’t remember any advice that she gave. I just remember her listening to me sharing how I was feeling. And, and then she advocated for me. She supported me through it and it made such an impact on me. And I looked at her and I said, “how can I do what you’re doing?” And she told me, and so she said, “you first got to get a degree in education.” So that’s what I did. And that was what pushed me into education. So I got my degree, and then I had a couple positions where I got to work with students from all from preschool to high school. So I’ve worked with all different age students throughout my career. And then when Aiden, my second was born, I decided to stay home for a couple years and give myself a chance to go back to school. So when Sayge was five weeks old, you guys, five weeks old. And she was my first class of grad school. It was my vision and that was separate from my kids. So when Aiden was born, the hearing loss diagnosis was shocking. We had no idea. We didn’t know anyone with hearing loss. We didn’t know what we were doing and we didn’t know what to expect. And there’s a lot of questions and a lot of fear. Some of that fear robbed some joy and I felt looking back, I felt really bummed by that. I didn’t feel like it was necessary. I mean, I get that. Yes, it’s necessary. I felt like, yes, I’ve had those feelings, but it was our experiences so much better than anything I could have ever imagined.

Elise:

Like your feelings were valid, but you wish you took in more of the little moments and enjoyed it. Like you were able to do with Sayge when you were more relaxed.

Melissa:

So When Sage was born, exactly, I felt like I’m going to do this different because I know how amazing it’s going to be. Like, it doesn’t have to be a scary thing and I knew a lot more. And I knew also what I needed. When Aiden was born, I felt very isolated and very alone. And I knew that for me to be a better mom and more healthy that I needed to be around people who had experienced something similar. So that’s what actually got me connected with Phonak was through Sage. They have a blog for people all over on the hearing loss world. They have a blog that’s very inclusive. I got connected with them and found little communities of support and it was definitely different with Sayge. So it was a very, empowering experience with her.

Haley:

Going back to what you said about how you had all three children and then you decided to go back to graduate school. You’re supermom, I don’t really understand how you could do that. Especially as you know, I’m not a parent and I have a full-time job and I’m also going to grad school and I can barely keep my head on straight. So that’s amazing

Elise:

To have a five week old, right.

Haley:

Right, yes. But do you think having children with hearing loss, I know you said back in high school, you were looking at being a school counselor and you kind of already knew that path, but do you think having children with hearing loss kind of solidified that dream or helped you realize you wanted to advocate for children with hearing loss through your school counselor position? Tell us a little bit about that and how did this come about and how did having children with hearing loss lead you to being the school counselor here at Child’s Voice?

Melissa:

I always knew I wanted to be a school counselor. I wanted to support students. And so that was, that was definitely never a question. I never envisioned myself working with children with hearing loss until I had Sayge and going through that experience and getting connected with Phonak. I started writing our story and little pieces, little blog post on how we teach self-advocacy at home. And I didn’t know that self-advocacy was a class at a school like Child’s Voice, which it is. And I teach co-teach now with Elise. So I didn’t know that that existed. And I had a different thought of what I wanted for, or a different idea of what my career was going to look like. It was just kind of by chance that a position opened at Child’s Voice. And I took it, I grabbed it and it was a dream job for me. I think a lot of those thoughts came out. I loved being able to support other families. When I was writing with Phonak, I would get messages daily from parents all over the world, looking for support, advice. Honestly, I think looking for someone to say, “it’s going to be okay, your child’s going to be okay. “And really wanted to be that voice. I really wanted to say, “listen, it’s not just okay. It is amazing.” It’s amazing, the joy of watching what my kids are overcoming, I could not be prouder. So that was really a powerful thing. And I experienced that through writing for Phonak. And so when Child’s Voice had an open position where that was a piece of the job description. I couldn’t believe it! So it was never something I had envisioned. But it was exactly the right fit for me.

Haley:

Well, and that kind of flows perfectly. You know, I was about to ask you, what is your favorite part, but I think you being so emotional just shows that you want to be that support. And I actually get to experience how amazing your child is firsthand as I’ve had her. And I’m lucky to be her teacher. And I think you joining our Child’s vVoice team while it’s been so beneficial for our students, I know that you’ve really aimed to connect with those parents and to be that voice. I mean, you’re on the parent association, you had that and you’re always calling and you’re always checking in. And so I think that’s quite an amazing piece to you that you’ve also had this experience with Phonak to talk through all of this with families. And you brought that here and that’s something that we’ve kind of been missing and it’s been really cool to see that. So I’m very thankful you’re a part of our team and I would echo what you said. These kids can do amazing things. It’s not just going to be okay. So I really appreciate you. And I’m really glad you’re here. I think before we started this discussion, when you said we have to look at the whole kid. And that’s a new perspective, we’re so used to language we’re so used to speech, we’re so used to social emotional, but you have a whole rounded approach as to how to look at the kids. And it definitely shows that you have experience, and that’s a passion of yours, especially when you involve the family, because we always say it takes a community or a team. That’s like the core of your philosophy.

Elise:

So as a parent of children with hearing loss, so you went through that grief process that you talked a little bit about when you got the diagnosis of both Aiden and Sayge. This is an area that we don’t always talk about as professionals. Can you talk a little bit more about how that grief process was for you?

Melissa:

Yeah. When Aiden was born, we just were clueless. We knew nothing. It felt like what is an audiogram? What does this mean for my kid? You’re just trying to learn as much as you can. What does mild versus moderate versus severe versus profound? Why doesn’t my kid qualify for a cochlear implant? The deaf community, lowercase d, is so vast and there’s so many components to it. So we just, there’s a lot of learning and it was really overwhelming. That was isolating in it of itself. How could I explain to my parents what was happening when I didn’t even really know? It’s not just me that’s grieving, it is my parents. It’s my siblings. It’s everyone trying to support us and not knowing how to support us. There’s feeling a lot of those unknowns. I think there’s just a level of grief and that this isn’t what I expected. This isn’t how I envisioned what my child would be like, feeling guilt about that and trying to reconcile that, trying to be honest with myself. I had this beautiful, healthy baby boy in my arms and I felt there’s shame in there. Like, did I do something? What did I do wrong? There’s all of those pieces that played into some deep and dark emotions, which I think is part of that grief. And some of it is valid and some of it was not valid and I had to shift through to find truth. And I know this is maybe cheesy, but the Mumford and Sons song where he has a line that says, “keep the earth below my feet.” And I felt like that was like my song of that season, as I felt like I could get floating away into worry and fear and whatever. And I had to bring myself back down to reality and be grounded. Like keep me down because it could be easy to float away and in fear and worry. So that was a really difficult part. But I think the grief was different with Sayge. I don’t think I felt it in that same intensity. And to me when Sayge was born, it was a choice. I could go back there and to that, that place, or I could choose to be empowered by the experience. And that’s what I chose to do. And that was very healing for me to do it differently with her. And I really, really just valued that experience. And I think that helps. And it doesn’t ever really go away. The grief flows a little bit. Sometimes it’s like there in the background and sometimes it comes in like back in the forefront and then it’s just naming it, processing it, talking. I went to therapy, I went to my family. I made sure I was surrounded by friends. I got in a mom’s group. I was going to do whatever it took to support me and my family, because I also knew that if I didn’t work through my stuff, my kids are going to feel it. They are going to internalize what I was experiencing, the shame I was experiencing. I did not want them experiencing that. So I knew I had to work through my stuff so that they didn’t have to take on unnecessary pain.

Haley:

That is so powerful that you said that because I do think sometimes, especially our kids, we see, quote, they can’t hear much, or they get told that, or people think that they pick up on a lot. And I think they sometimes pick up on, when kids can’t understand them, like, or if a parent isn’t as happy with the situation, I think our kids are very sensitive to that. And that’s so powerful that you wanted to feel safe and you wanted to feel empowered by that so your kids could see through that. And I know that we mentioned there are cycles of grief and well kind of touch on that, but that’s really important that you have to kind of solidify where you’re at at first and then you’ll kind of get through the rest of it because nobody knows what’s to come. So I think that’s awesome that you did that,

Elise:

And it sounds like that experience ties into this favorite part of your job, connecting with your community and parents that have like experiences and are going through the same thing maybe ahead of you or behind you. Is there anything that you would like to say to parents that are starting the grief process as their children maybe begin to start school and might not be meeting milestones of their siblings or their other peers?

Melissa:

Every person, every parents, moms and dads and children all are going to experience it in their own unique way. And I think it’s important just to be honest and name the emotions you are feeling. That’s essentially what I teach a daily basis is naming, coping with your emotions. But as parents, we have to do that. And when we name our emotion or named the experience that we’re having, that allows us to take the next step to figure out what we need to help that process. So I think about any new parents that are newly diagnosed and that are listening, and they’re just looking for someone that has experienced something that they’ve experienced, that there is a community out there and you have to look for it. And you have to be open to that. So I would encourage parents to get a support system, even if it’s not within the hearing loss community, but having a support system is so important and being honest. And if you need to get support like therapy, that can be really powerful for parents. And I said this earlier, but you know, if I could tell any parent that is just diagnosed or they’re just beginning of this journey, I just would want to like wrap my arms around them and hug them and tell them “it’s going to be okay. It’s going to be great.”

Haley:

Even as a teacher you look at a student and you worry about where they will be in a year or I’m not doing enough because of XYZ. And so I think it’s really important that you brought up having a support system, whether that’s a mom Facebook group, whether it’s you as a school counselor stepping in and having those conversations. I think just finding that even as a teacher, I need to have other teachers around me that can say “you’re doing a great job.” So finding that support can really, really make all the difference it can make or break.

Melissa:

I think of Frozen 2, when Ana says “you just have to do the next right thing”. And I would say that to newly diagnosed families, like just do the next right thing.. I got so caught up with, “are they going to get married? “, you’re like 20 years down the line and w”hat is school going to be like, will they be bullied? Are they going to fit in? Will they be able to share and express,” like you have all of these huge fears, but  in the moment you have a three-month baby, like, that’s what you have right there. Like just do the next right thing now. Those things work themselves out. You don’t have to worry about them today.

Haley:

That’s a wonderful reminder. Everybody needs that. It’s one step at a time. It’s one foot in front of the other.

Elise:

And you’re growing with them. So they understand that you’re growing, you understand that they’re growing and it’s not the big jump of you have a newborn, your newborn can’t walk yet. They’re not walking away from you. You can focus on that and then go to the next stage. So what we say all the time with teaching, take it one day at a time. You might need to take it one minute at a time until you can last an hour at a time.

Haley:

We talked about going to school can start the grief process or as your child goes into school and you said, well, “can they share, are they sharing emotions, et cetera.” And you said also that you focus a lot on naming those emotions. And we see it day in and day out. You’re in Ms. Robyn’s room, teaching emotions, you’re with Elise working on that. A while back, we did an episode on theory of mind with Landon Lacey. And she talked a lot about naming those emotions as part of typical development. And so you expressed as a new parent, newly diagnosed, you didn’t know what that would look like for them. So why is it so important to name these emotions that children are going through? Why is that such an important step to get them more socially competent?

Melissa:

When you name emotions for yourself, as well as your children, teaching them, it’s the first stop and being able to self-regulate. So when you think about these like big emotions that all of us experience and have, when we can name it, it becomes more manageable. At Child’s Voice, we talk a lot about the zones of regulation and part of the zones is to help us identify what we’re feeling so that we can find appropriate coping skill. There’s an author, Dan Siegel, author of Whole Brain Child. And he came up with the term of it as “name it, to tame it,” which is the idea of the importance of naming that emotion and what it does and the impact it has on our kids. There’s a lot of research that goes with it. One key study that was done was they found that, you have this intense anger, like if you feel angry and you have someone that pushes it away, it doesn’t necessarily diminish the anger. In fact, it can make it continue, or you find a different way of dealing it with maybe an unhealthy ways. So when we name the, the anger, what they were noticing is that the feeling is in the amygdala part of our brain, which is our feeling parts of our brain. And when you name the feeling, you are activing, the prefrontal cortex, which is like a left and right brain, more balanced. And you’re diminishing the amygdala a little bit. You’re not taking the amygdala away. You’re not trying to take the emotion away, you’re just starting to have more balance, which then allows you to manage the emotion. So this is like important for every child and every human being out there is knowing how to name the feeling and then figure out how to, how to regulate that the key part of our social development, which is theory of mind and dealing with disappointments and all of those pieces help with learning too. It develops our kids’ emotional vocabulary. And when you think about, and I knew this for Sayge, when she was one, she was feeling like embarrassment, which you’re like, oh my gosh, my one-year-old like, it seems like such a complex emotion. And I remember being like, “how do I name this for her?” She’s feeling this complex emotion just because our kids have hearing loss and they can’t say what the word is doesn’t mean they’re not feeling something that word is.

Haley:

I totally understand and feel very strongly about where you’re coming, because I know a lot of people will say our kids aren’t there yet, or they don’t have that language, but we’re also taught as teachers and Elise, you went through too, is to scaffold that language. And just because they can’t name, it doesn’t mean they can’t feel it. Maybe they’re saying, I feel mad. I’m like, well, no, you’re feeling frustrated because of X, Y, and Z. And I know that Landon talked about too, having that emotional vocabulary, she has a whole list of really when your kid starts talking about being mad, start introducing, you’re feeling frustrated. You’re feeling angry because you’re right. Every child has the right to be able to name that emotion, to feel that emotion. So we need to give them the language to do that.

Melissa:

Yes.

Elise:

And I think sometimes as teachers or professionals or parents, we feel maybe uncomfortable with talking about the emotions and you do sometimes think if we bring attention to it, if we talk about it, if we really harp on it or, whatever it may be, that’s, it’s going to get bigger. The child is going to feel it more, it might snowball into a bigger issue, but name it to tame is such a great thing to remember. You can move it to one part of your brain and try to use both sides that are balanced, so feel the emotion you talk about it, and you can move through it. The zones of regulation, the talking about the emotions out loud and finding the zone that you’re in. I participate in the zone, the feeling check-in and the zones of regulation. And that was something new to me that I was not realizing I’m in the yellow zone. I’m frustrated and irritated, and I don’t know why, but that’s okay. And it’s, it’s helped me get more aligned and back to the green zone or just back to feeling like I can deal with what I need to deal with. It’s been, it’s been really helpful for me too.

Haley:

Can you do like a quick explanation of what the zones are because we’re familiar and I’m like, “oh, I hear you say green zone, yellow zone”, but maybe some of our listeners don’t know.

Melissa:

The zones of regulation are a way of essentially categorizing emotions. So the green zone is our goal. We want to be in the green zone, we’re ready to learn. And so we are focused, where our eyes are on the teacher,  we’re feeling good, we’re feeling calm. we’re feeling in control of our bodies.  And sometimes, and not at the fault of anyone, we get a headache. We have a tummy ache. We have to go to the bathroom. Things come in through the day. So we do a lot of mindfulness with our students too, and how to be of our bodies so that we can recognize, “wait a second. I’m wiggling, I’m uncomfortable. When you’re wiggling uncomfortable, cause you have to go to the bathroom and your tummy hurts, you’re not necessarily focusing on what your teacher is saying, and then you’re not learning. Right? So if our goal is learning, we want our kids to maximize learning. You want to teach them themselves how to be aware of their own bodies so that they can recognize when they need to cope in some way, I’m going to be aware of that. My tummy hurts. Why is my tummy hurting? Well, I have to go the bathroom. Oh, wait, I might be sick.

Elise:

Or sometimes I’m feeling worried and anxious and nervous about something.

Melissa:

Exactly. And so then you might be in the yellow zone, are worried or even silly, like when you’re so silly, you can’t focus or you’re. So you’re so excited. You’re, can’t stop thinking about the play date after school. So you’re not focusing on what’s happening. It’s where your mind is at. So we’ll say, oh, you’re in the yellow zone. And or you might be or in the blue zone, which is sad or hurt or tired. And you’re moving slow, like a snail so you might be in the blue zone or our red zone is our anger, frustration. You’re taking out your anger with your body and all the yellow, the red and the blue are when we are not in a place of learning. So we want to be able to name that, recognize that so that we can then have coping skills that are appropriate. So when you’re tired, what you would do to cope with your tiredness is not going to necessarily be the same you would do if you’re feeling silly and you can’t settle down so you want to then be mindful of the coping skill you choose.

Haley:

That was a really good way to describe it. For our listeners, if you want to look more into the zones of regulation, this is also something you can do at your home. So I know we really didn’t get into attachment or what you can do at home, but naming those emotions and being able to say, “I’m in the yellow zone, how can we fix this? I’m in the red zone, how can we deal with this in a healthier way?” That was a great way to tell everyone, this is a really simple way to name these emotions and to work from there

Elise:

At school, we’ve been talking about building our toolbox and what helps you. If you’re sad, you might listen to music, you might read a book, you might color in your journal, draw a picture, express yourself.

Are there any suggestions on how to build some of these social-emotional skills at home with that kids can do with their parents?

Melissa:

One of the things I really emphasized over remote learning with parents and families is to, and it can be super simple, build a calming corner or calming space at home and I can send a link on all the description and what that could look like, but calming center at home is great. I put up our feelings like pictures and calming strategies and even having the zones of regulation up there as a way of just continuing to build that vocabulary and giving a safe place to have those emotions. I mean, everybody gets angry. It’s one of our Kimoji phrases is “it’s okay to be mad. It’s not okay to be mean”. And so how do we make sure that we have that emotion that we’re experiencing without hurting ourselves or others through that emotion? So calm down corners are great. And I think for parents learning to be okay with their own feelings and their own emotions and learning to reframe some things is something, I had to do some unlearning. It was really easy for me to say as a, like, “you’re okay, you’re okay, you’re fine.” And they’re like screaming and they’re like, “I’m not fine, I’m not fine.”  And so finding other ways that to me, “I see you. I see you. You’re sad. You’re hurting. I’m here, I’m here.” And I started retraining the way that I soothed my child with my words because it might feel soothing to hear “you’re okay.” And that might work sometimes, but it’s really helpful too, for a child to know that they are being understood and that can help that even that de- escalating emotion. A couple of ones “I can see this as hard for you.” If a child’s feeling frustrated and “I can see, this is hard for you, I care about how you feel. It’s okay to be angry. I will stay with you. I’m here for you.” I liked this one is “even when you’re at your worst, I still love you. I love you.” Even when you’re struggling, I love you. These emotions are okay. So I think working in thinking through those are things that parents can do at home.

Haley:

Well, that was a beautiful, beautiful way to end that note, because even though you are at your worst, I love you is something that we all benefit from. As an adult, I would love to hear that even in my worst moment. So thank you so much for everything that you said today. We are so lucky to have had you, and thank you for joining us on another episode of all ears at child’s voice, be sure to join us for our next episode. We release episodes once monthly,

Elise:

You can follow us. And this podcast on Instagram with the handle at child’s voice podcast, we love

Haley:

To hear from you. So please send us an email at podcast@child’s voice.org, and you can find episodes, show notes and archived episodes at our Child’s Voice website, childsvoice.org.

Elise:

And if you’re interested in learning more about child’s voice, we are on Facebook as well as Twitter with the handle at Childs underscore voice. No apostrophe, thank you for listening. Bye.

Haley:

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Children:

Bye! Thanks for listening!